Vegetables for Diabetes


Vegetables For Diabetes

Vegetables For Diabetes

 If You’re over 30 With Diabetes, Be Warned….

Vegetables For Diabetes

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Vegetables For Diabetes

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Vegetables for Diabetes
_Which Fruits and Vegetables Can Diabetics Eat?

10 Diabetes Super Foods
Eating right is key to managing diabetes. Here are 10 super foods that will help minimize blood sugar and even throw your disease into reverse:

1. Vegetables. Packed with powerhouse nutrients, vegetables are naturally low in calories, and they're full of fiber, so they're plenty filling. Loading your plate with vegetables will automatically mean you're eating fewer simple carbs (which raise blood sugar) and saturated fats (which increase insulin resistance).

2. Fruit. Packed with almost all the same advantages as vegetables fruit is brimming with nutrients you need, it's low in fat, it's high in fiber, and it's lower in calories than most other foods. Best of all, fruit is loaded with antioxidants that help protect your nerves, your eyes, and your heart.

3. Beans. Beans are just about your best source of dietary fiber, which not only makes you feel full longer, it actually slows digestion and keeps blood sugar from spiking after a meal. This effect is so powerful that it can even lower your overall blood sugar levels.

4. Cereal. The right breakfast cereal is your absolute best opportunity to pack more fiber into your day. There's a bonus: Studies show that people who start the morning with a high-fiber cereal actually eat less later on. So don't forgo breakfast. Better yet, choose a cereal with at least 5 grams fiber per serving. Good choices include Kashi GoLean Crunch! (10 grams), Kellogg's Raisin Bran (8 grams), General Mills Multi-Bran Chex (8 grams), Post Wheat 'N Bran Spoon Size (8 grams), Kellogg's All-Bran Original (10 grams) and General Mills Fiber One (14 grams). Top your cereal with fruit and you've checked off a fruit serving for the day.

5. Fish. Fast and easy to prepare, fish is a good source of protein, and a great substitute for higher-fat meats. Also, fatty fish is the best source of omega-3 fatty acids, those remarkable good-for-you fats that help keep the arteries clear. People with diabetes often have high triglycerides and low levels of HDL, the 'good' cholesterol. Omega-3 fatty acids can improve both numbers. Aim to eat fish at least twice a week. Excellent sources of omega-3s are salmon, mackerel, and tuna.

6. Poultry breast. Versatile, extremely lean, and low in calories, chicken breast is practically a miracle food. Unlike steaks and hamburgers, it's low in saturated fat, which raises 'bad' cholesterol and may increase insulin resistance, making blood sugar control more difficult. A 3-ounce serving of skinless chicken breast has only 142 calories and 3 grams fat. Turkey breast is even leaner and lower in calories.

7. Nuts. Nuts have several things going for them — and for you. They're loaded with 'good' fats that fight heart disease. These fats have even been shown to help reduce insulin resistance and make blood sugar easier to control. Nuts are also one of the best food sources of vitamin E, an antioxidant that protects cells and may help prevent nerve and eye damage. They are rich in fiber and magnesium, both of which may help regulate your blood sugar. Studies suggest that including them in your diet may even help you lose weight – if you eat them in moderation. Don't forget that they're high in calories.

8. Olive oil. At the center of the famously heart-healthy Mediterranean diet is olive oil is considered a 'good' fat that helps slash the risk of heart attack — and has been shown to help keep blood sugar steady by reducing insulin resistance.

9. Yogurt. Yogurt is rich in protein and another weight loss powerhouse: calcium. Several studies have shown that people who eat plenty of calcium-rich foods have an easier time losing weight – and are less likely to become insulin resistant.

10. Cinnamon. Believe it! Amazingly, just by sprinkling cinnamon on your foods, you could lower your blood sugar. Components in cinnamon help the body use insulin more efficiently, so more glucose can enter cells.

Healthy eating and diabetes

Diabetes: Suitable Foods for Diabetics

Where can I learn about making a diabetes meal plan?
Contact a registered dietitian to make a meal plan just for you.

Visit the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, formerly the American Dietetic Association Web site to find a nutrition professional that can help you develop a healthy meal plan (www.eatright.org).
Visit the American Association of Diabetes Educators to find a diabetes educator (www.diabeteseducator.org).
Visit the American Diabetes Association Web site for more information on carbohydrate counting and the exchange method (www.diabetes.org).

Vegetables for Diabetes

Vegetables for Diabetes
_Which Fruits and Vegetables Can Diabetics Eat?

10 Diabetes Super Foods
Eating right is key to managing diabetes. Here are 10 super foods that will help minimize blood sugar and even throw your disease into reverse:
http://www.rd.com/slideshows/10-diabetes-super-foods/#slideshow=slide10

1. Vegetables. Packed with powerhouse nutrients, vegetables are naturally low in calories, and they're full of fiber, so they're plenty filling. Loading your plate with vegetables will automatically mean you're eating fewer simple carbs (which raise blood sugar) and saturated fats (which increase insulin resistance).

2. Fruit. Packed with almost all the same advantages as vegetables fruit is brimming with nutrients you need, it's low in fat, it's high in fiber, and it's lower in calories than most other foods. Best of all, fruit is loaded with antioxidants that help protect your nerves, your eyes, and your heart.

3. Beans. Beans are just about your best source of dietary fiber, which not only makes you feel full longer, it actually slows digestion and keeps blood sugar from spiking after a meal. This effect is so powerful that it can even lower your overall blood sugar levels.

4. Cereal. The right breakfast cereal is your absolute best opportunity to pack more fiber into your day. There's a bonus: Studies show that people who start the morning with a high-fiber cereal actually eat less later on. So don't forgo breakfast. Better yet, choose a cereal with at least 5 grams fiber per serving. Good choices include Kashi GoLean Crunch! (10 grams), Kellogg's Raisin Bran (8 grams), General Mills Multi-Bran Chex (8 grams), Post Wheat 'N Bran Spoon Size (8 grams), Kellogg's All-Bran Original (10 grams) and General Mills Fiber One (14 grams). Top your cereal with fruit and you've checked off a fruit serving for the day.

5. Fish. Fast and easy to prepare, fish is a good source of protein, and a great substitute for higher-fat meats. Also, fatty fish is the best source of omega-3 fatty acids, those remarkable good-for-you fats that help keep the arteries clear. People with diabetes often have high triglycerides and low levels of HDL, the 'good' cholesterol. Omega-3 fatty acids can improve both numbers. Aim to eat fish at least twice a week. Excellent sources of omega-3s are salmon, mackerel, and tuna.

6. Poultry breast. Versatile, extremely lean, and low in calories, chicken breast is practically a miracle food. Unlike steaks and hamburgers, it's low in saturated fat, which raises 'bad' cholesterol and may increase insulin resistance, making blood sugar control more difficult. A 3-ounce serving of skinless chicken breast has only 142 calories and 3 grams fat. Turkey breast is even leaner and lower in calories.

7. Nuts. Nuts have several things going for them -- and for you. They're loaded with 'good' fats that fight heart disease. These fats have even been shown to help reduce insulin resistance and make blood sugar easier to control. Nuts are also one of the best food sources of vitamin E, an antioxidant that protects cells and may help prevent nerve and eye damage. They are rich in fiber and magnesium, both of which may help regulate your blood sugar. Studies suggest that including them in your diet may even help you lose weight - if you eat them in moderation. Don't forget that they're high in calories.

8. Olive oil. At the center of the famously heart-healthy Mediterranean diet is olive oil is considered a 'good' fat that helps slash the risk of heart attack -- and has been shown to help keep blood sugar steady by reducing insulin resistance.

9. Yogurt. Yogurt is rich in protein and another weight loss powerhouse: calcium. Several studies have shown that people who eat plenty of calcium-rich foods have an easier time losing weight - and are less likely to become insulin resistant.

10. Cinnamon. Believe it! Amazingly, just by sprinkling cinnamon on your foods, you could lower your blood sugar. Components in cinnamon help the body use insulin more efficiently, so more glucose can enter cells.

Healthy eating and diabetes
http://www.betterhealth.vic.gov.au/bhcv2/bhcarticles.nsf/pages/diabetes_and_healthy_eating

Diabetes: Suitable Foods for Diabetics
http://www.second-opinions.co.uk/foods.html

Where can I learn about making a diabetes meal plan?
Contact a registered dietitian to make a meal plan just for you.

Visit the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, formerly the American Dietetic Association Web site to find a nutrition professional that can help you develop a healthy meal plan (www.eatright.org).
Visit the American Association of Diabetes Educators to find a diabetes educator (www.diabeteseducator.org).
Visit the American Diabetes Association Web site for more information on carbohydrate counting and the exchange method (www.diabetes.org).