Gestational diabetes symptoms during pregnancy


Gestational Diabetes Symptoms During Pregnancy

Gestational Diabetes Symptoms During Pregnancy

 If You’re over 30 With Diabetes, Be Warned….

Gestational Diabetes Symptoms During Pregnancy

More Than 75% of Diabetics Die Of Heart Disease…

Gestational Diabetes Symptoms During Pregnancy

Discover your risk for heart disease or stroke now!

Gestational Diabetes Symptoms During Pregnancy

Click Here To Take The Test Now!

Gestational Diabetes Symptoms During Pregnancy

Nearly half of those who die from heart attacks each year never showed prior symptoms of heart disease.

Gestational Diabetes Symptoms During Pregnancy

Right now, millions of people over age 40 are suffering from heart disease and do not even know it.

Don’t be caught off guard. Know your risk now.

We’ve created a simple, easy-to-complete, online test that will help you understand your heart attack risk factors. When you take the Simple Heart Test — it takes just 1 minutes to complete —

Discover your risk for heart disease and stroke now. Click Here To Take The Test Now!

Gestational diabetes Gestational diabetes typically does not cause any noticeable signs or symptoms. This is why screening tests are so important. Rarely, an increase in thirst or increased urination may be noticed.gestational diabetes during pregnancy
gestational diabetes meal plan
gestational diabetes diet
gestational diabetes mellitus
gestational diabetes nursing
gestational diabetes pathophysiology
gestational diabetes recipes
gestational diabetes baby
gestational diabetes animation
gestational diabetes test
gestational diabetes meal plan
gestational diabetes mellitus
gestational diabetes management

How is gestational diabetes diagnosed?

Gestational diabetes is diagnosed with blood tests. Most pregnant women are tested between the 24th and 28th weeks of pregnancy, but if you have risk factors, your doctor may decide to test earlier in the pregnancy.

Blood testing confirms the diagnosis. A screening glucose challenge test involves drinking a sugary beverage and having your blood drawn for testing of glucose levels an hour later. If the screening test is not normal, you may need additional testing. Another type of test is an oral glucose challenge test (OGTT). For this test your baseline blood glucose level is checked and then measured at 1, 2, and sometimes 3 hours after consuming a sugary drink.

Glycated hemoglobin, or hemoglobin A1c, is another test that may be performed. This test is used to monitor long-term blood glucose levels in people with diabetes. The hemoglobin A1c percentage offers a measure of the average blood glucose level over the past few months.

What are the consequences of gestational diabetes for the baby and mother?

Women with gestational diabetes who receive proper care typically go on to deliver healthy babies. However, if you have high blood glucose levels, this means the fetus also has high blood glucose levels. The elevation in blood glucose can cause the fetus to be larger than normal, possibly making delivery more complicated. The baby is also at risk for having low blood glucose (hypoglycemia) immediately after birth. Other serious complications of poorly controlled gestational diabetes in the newborn can include an increased risk of jaundice, an increased risk for respiratory distress syndrome, and a higher chance of dying before or following birth. The baby is also at a greater risk of becoming overweight and developing type 2 diabetes later in life.

Gestational diabetes symptoms during pregnancy

Gestational diabetes Gestational diabetes typically does not cause any noticeable signs or symptoms. This is why screening tests are so important. Rarely, an increase in thirst or increased urination may be noticed.gestational diabetes during pregnancy
gestational diabetes meal plan
gestational diabetes diet
gestational diabetes mellitus
gestational diabetes nursing
gestational diabetes pathophysiology
gestational diabetes recipes
gestational diabetes baby
gestational diabetes animation
gestational diabetes test
gestational diabetes meal plan
gestational diabetes mellitus
gestational diabetes management

How is gestational diabetes diagnosed?

Gestational diabetes is diagnosed with blood tests. Most pregnant women are tested between the 24th and 28th weeks of pregnancy, but if you have risk factors, your doctor may decide to test earlier in the pregnancy.

Blood testing confirms the diagnosis. A screening glucose challenge test involves drinking a sugary beverage and having your blood drawn for testing of glucose levels an hour later. If the screening test is not normal, you may need additional testing. Another type of test is an oral glucose challenge test (OGTT). For this test your baseline blood glucose level is checked and then measured at 1, 2, and sometimes 3 hours after consuming a sugary drink.

Glycated hemoglobin, or hemoglobin A1c, is another test that may be performed. This test is used to monitor long-term blood glucose levels in people with diabetes. The hemoglobin A1c percentage offers a measure of the average blood glucose level over the past few months.

What are the consequences of gestational diabetes for the baby and mother?

Women with gestational diabetes who receive proper care typically go on to deliver healthy babies. However, if you have high blood glucose levels, this means the fetus also has high blood glucose levels. The elevation in blood glucose can cause the fetus to be larger than normal, possibly making delivery more complicated. The baby is also at risk for having low blood glucose (hypoglycemia) immediately after birth. Other serious complications of poorly controlled gestational diabetes in the newborn can include an increased risk of jaundice, an increased risk for respiratory distress syndrome, and a higher chance of dying before or following birth. The baby is also at a greater risk of becoming overweight and developing type 2 diabetes later in life.